Book Roundup: Women in Antiquity

theancientworld:

These are a selection of source books and scholarly works on the fascinating (and often overlooked) subject of women in antiquity:

Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity, by Sarah B. Pomeroy, an essential study of the lives of women in Greece and Rome. “The first treatment to reflect the critical insights of modern feminism.” — Mary Beard

Women in Classical World: Image and Text, by Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, “The first book on classical women to give equal weight to written texts and artistic representations, it brings together a great wealth of materials—poetry, vase painting, legislation, medical treatises, architecture, religious and funerary art, women’s ornaments, historical epics, political speeches, even ancient coins—to present women in the historical and cultural context of their time.”

The Sacred and the Feminine in Ancient Greece, by Sue Blundell, Margaret Williamson, a collection of essays exploring the intersection between women and religion in Ancient Greece.

Daughters of Isis: Women of Ancient Egypt, by Joyce A. Tyldesley, an extremely readable overview of the lives of women in ancient Egypt.

The Woman and the Lyre: Women Writers and Classical Greece and Rome, by Jane McIntosh Synder, "The pages of Snyder’s text are filled with stirring revelations about women’s achievements."—Susan C. Jarratt, Composition Chronicle

All titles link to the book’s Amazon page.

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source
Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.
The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.
Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.
It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source

Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.

The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.

Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.

It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

supersonicart:

Craftsy’s “Beginner’s Guide to Watercolor,” a FREE Downloadable eGuide.

Sponsoring Supersonic this week is Craftsy who are offering a downloadable eGuide, "The Beginner’s Guide to Watercolor" for FREE! 

Watercolor is quite difficult to get the hang of but is used everywhere, from the fashion world to the illustration world.  This free eGuide from Craftsy covers all the basics from types of watercolor paper all the way to the tones and intensity of colors.  It’s truly a great resource for any one interested in Watercolor.

To download the free eGuide (Valued at $5) simply click the link below and either register or sign in!

Craftsy’s Free eGuide, “Beginner’s Guide to Watercolor.”

“I have been thinking a lot about stupidity lately, largely, I suppose, because I spend a good deal of time online. I define stupidity as “remediable but unremedied ignorance,” and few human traits are more evident to a reader of your average website. It is relatively easy to discover that Barack Obama is not a Muslim; that the government of Israel was not responsible for the 9/11 attacks; that the Christian God does not hate fags; that your average everyday evangelical Christian is not simply itching for his chance to take over the government and impose theocratic law upon a nation of vile unbelieving reprobates. Yet people who could remedy their ignorance on these and many other matters consistently fail to do so. This is curious and significant.”

actualmenacebuckybarnes:

americachavez:

people keep trying to argue with me that gotg “subverts” the “tropes” in classic sci fi but a. ha ha no and b. jesus christ do you even know the difference between “subversion” and “relies exclusively on nothing but basic tropes in a shallow manner that does not critique any of the problems inherent in said tropes” because there is a small but crucial difference here

welcome to the 21st century, where “subvert” means “actually use in the standard way” and “satire” means “offensive but they were trying to be FUNNY OKAY” 

gabrielsaunteredvaguelydownwards:

of ALL THE THINGS IN SCIENCE, why would you pick something that’s clearly not a planet no longer being called a planet to be enthusiastic and mad about

theartofnotwriting:

Pascalle
our ends are beginnings

(Sometimes I just reblog all the awesome things Beth Revis finds.)
stopdropandvogue:

Tim Walker’s Pastel Cats
"A lot of people get confused when they see this image. They think it was done by computer, but we actually took pigment powder, mixed it with talc to get the right ice-cream pastel colours, and brushed it into the cats.
The owners were two proud members of the Persian cat club. I can’t remember how I found them, but they turned up in a van, covered in cat fur, and stood breathing down my neck as I took the picture. We were worried about putting all that powder into the animals’ fur, but they said, ‘Oh no, they absolutely love it.’ The cats were such vain creatures - they adored being touched and pampered.
We didn’t really think about which cats, or how many, should be done in which colours. We just did each one, and then they had to go back into their cat beds in the owners’ van. I think I lost count of how many were pink and how many were blue, but when we were finished they all came out and looked great together. There wasn’t enough light to do the picture indoors - but, by a fluke, all the cats seemed to gravitate to this clematis at the bottom of some steps. I didn’t arrange them. This is just what the cats did, and they all pretty much stayed where they were throughout. So it’s actually quite a naturalistic portrait - apart from the colour.
At the time, in May 1998, I had no idea how the picture would resonate with people. But it has been the image I’ve been asked about the most. For some reason, people are just fascinated with it - more than any model, house or celebrity I’ve ever shot. Everyone wants to know about the pastel cats.” -Tim Walker
Interview by Leo Benedictus

stopdropandvogue:

Tim Walker’s Pastel Cats

"A lot of people get confused when they see this image. They think it was done by computer, but we actually took pigment powder, mixed it with talc to get the right ice-cream pastel colours, and brushed it into the cats.

The owners were two proud members of the Persian cat club. I can’t remember how I found them, but they turned up in a van, covered in cat fur, and stood breathing down my neck as I took the picture. We were worried about putting all that powder into the animals’ fur, but they said, ‘Oh no, they absolutely love it.’ The cats were such vain creatures - they adored being touched and pampered.

We didn’t really think about which cats, or how many, should be done in which colours. We just did each one, and then they had to go back into their cat beds in the owners’ van. I think I lost count of how many were pink and how many were blue, but when we were finished they all came out and looked great together. There wasn’t enough light to do the picture indoors - but, by a fluke, all the cats seemed to gravitate to this clematis at the bottom of some steps. I didn’t arrange them. This is just what the cats did, and they all pretty much stayed where they were throughout. So it’s actually quite a naturalistic portrait - apart from the colour.

At the time, in May 1998, I had no idea how the picture would resonate with people. But it has been the image I’ve been asked about the most. For some reason, people are just fascinated with it - more than any model, house or celebrity I’ve ever shot. Everyone wants to know about the pastel cats.” -Tim Walker

Interview by Leo Benedictus

bemusedlybespectacled:

okay so everyone’s making “steve rogers freaks out the media with his rampant progressivism” posts but

imagine bruce banner

bruce banner, who has lived in poverty, who has been an undocumented worker, who has seen what happens in sweatshops in india and greenhouses in colombia, fighting to dismantle capitalism and take down the exploitive conditions that come with it

bruce banner, who isn’t doing anything with the massive salary tony pays him for “R&D work” (actually just him and tony in the lab but, hey, tony likes giving people stuff even if they don’t particularly want or need it) so he spends it all on a fund for abused children and personally hires lawyers and therapists for them because maybe he can’t have kids of his own but he can make damn sure that no one goes through what he went through

bruce banner, who fights against climate change and fracking and tapping national parks for resources, and tony ends up making a whole campaign around it called “go green with hulk” which bruce gets very annoyed by but “it tested well with focus groups, jolly green” so it goes through anyway and becomes massively popular

bruce going a little green around the pupils if someone so much as breathes the word “autism” and “vaccine” in the same sentence (and more than a little green if they insinuate that having an autistic child is a bad thing)

bruce fighting for universal health care

bruce working to destigmatize mental illness

bruce hulking out on the set of fox & friends (which predictably becomes a meme)

bruce. fucking. banner.